The History of Lessons: Power and Rule in Imperial Formations

Emmanuelle Saada is a sociologist and historian whose work on the French Empire bears on colonial legal categories and their articulation with race and citizenship. She currently teaches at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris. Her book Les Enfants de la colonie: les métis de l’Empire français entre sujétion et citoyennetéis […]

American Colonial Empire: The Limit of Power’s Reach

Julian Go is an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Illinois and was recently an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies. He is the co-editor of The American Colonial State in the Philippines: Global Perspectives (Duke University Press, 2003) and various articles on the United States colonial empire […]

Modernizing Colonialism and the Limits of Empire

Frederick Cooper is professor of history at New York University. His latest work has focused on 20th century African history, theoretical and historical issues in the study of colonial societies, and the relationship of social sciences to decolonization. In addition to critical essays on the concepts of “identity” and “globalization,” his recent publications include Africa […]

Chasing Ghosts: Alex de Waal on the rise and fall of militant Islam in the Horn of Africa

Alex de Waal is a fellow of the Global Equity Initiative at Harvard University, and programme director at the Social Science Research Council in New York. He is the author of Famine that Kills: Darfur, Sudan (revised edition, Oxford University Press 2005) and, jointly with Julie Flint, of Darfur: A Short History of a Long […]

Review of Gerard Prunier, Darfur: The Ambiguous Genocide, Hurst and Co.

Alex de Waal is a fellow of the Global Equity Initiative at Harvard University, and programme director at the Social Science Research Council in New York. He is the author of Famine that Kills: Darfur, Sudan (revised edition, Oxford University Press 2005) and, jointly with Julie Flint, of Darfur: A Short History of a Long […]

Who are the Darfurians? Arab and African Identities, Violence and External Engagement

Alex de Waal is a fellow of the Global Equity Initiative at Harvard University, and programme director at the Social Science Research Council in New York. He is the author of Famine that Kills: Darfur, Sudan (revised edition, Oxford University Press 2005) and, jointly with Julie Flint, of Darfur: A Short History of a Long […]

Why ‘We’ Lovehate ‘You’

Paul Smith is professor of cultural studies at George Mason University and chair in media studies at the University of Sussex, and author most recently of Millennial Dreams (Verso). “The reaction to the events of 11 September–terrible as they were–seems excessive to outsiders, and we have to say this to our American friends, although they have become […]

Expert Economic Advice and the Subalternity of Knowledge: Reflections on the Recent Argentine Crisis

Ricardo D. Salvatore is professor of modern history at Universidad Torcuato di Tella in Buenos Aires. He is author of Wandering Paysanos: State Order and Subaltern Experience in Buenos Aires During the Rosas Era (1820-1860) and coeditor of Crime and Punishment in Latin America: Law and Society since Late Colonial Times and Close Encounters of Empire: Writing […]